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How Queen can teach us about Customer Expectations in the Digital Age

I want it all, I want it all, and I want it now!Little did Freddie Mercury realise back in 1989 how prophetic his lyrics would be in describing the future of customer expectations. Although it’s likely that this subject wasn’t at the forefront of his thinking as Brian May penned the track, it did touch on the themes of ambition and social upheaval, both of which are highly relevant in today’s complex and constantly changing service landscape.

The fact is that the average customer in 2017 expects more, and this is increasingly the case within the younger age groups. Younger service consumers have grown up in an age where the Internet has always been a thing, apps are part of everyday life, and the ability to Snapchat an image to your friend two thousand miles away and get an instant response is not only possible, it is expected. Technology has, to all intents and purposes, liberated us from the shackles of conventional communication. We can now speak to our friends and family pretty much anywhere and at any time, using an array of services to get the job done.  The rise of instant messaging via SMS and subsequent evolution to asynchronous messaging via apps such as WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger have changed the way in which people communicate, at a fundamental level.

Over time, these technologies have become the new normal

And they continue to evolve. A perhaps unexpected implication of this is the change in expectations that customers have of their service providers. For many it feels jarring to switch from a seamless and frictionless conversation with a friend via WhatsApp to then have to call, for instance, a retailer’s customer service helpline, using the actual phone bit of their phone, deal with the automated response system, wait in a queue and then have to speak to a real live human in an effort to get what should, in theory, be a relatively simple piece of assistance. The immediacy, convenience and ‘always’ on nature of app-based services and mobile communications technologies has given customers a taste of the future; namely autonomy.  Instant access to what you need, when you need it and via the channel of your choice is rapidly becoming the new normal for large swathes of the population.

Research bears this out.  A recent UK survey of one thousand consumers showed that 65% were happier using chat services to talk to businesses than five years ago, and that 68% would rather use chat than either email or phone. This is a trend that is only going in one direction as the consumer demographic is populated by increasing numbers of young and technologically savvy folk who would think nothing of flitting between a conversation with their BFF in one instance and their mobile phone provider support desk in another, on Facebook Messenger, in real time.  On the bus.  At midnight.

In short, the very existence of these emerging technologies is making us, as people, more impatient, more selfish, and increasingly demanding, and this is starting to rub off on how we approach our service providers. If you are providing your customers with any kind of digital experience, whether this be via Web or Mobile, people now simply expect an experience similar to that obtained elsewhere within the digital domain. But let’s be real here for a moment. Providing a service normally reliant on people that can simultaneously tick those boxes of ubiquity and immediacy is, quite frankly, a real challenge.

The human factor

Availability of people and skills to service your customers will always be a constraint, and simply adding new channels only compounds this issue. The advent of useful Artificial Intelligence, however, will address this constraint. Intelligent bots to augment chat, messaging and voice channels can provide your existing workforce with the additional manpower (botpower?) needed to bridge the experience gap between ubiquitous immediate access to assistance, and sitting in a call queue. These bots won’t replace your human workforce, but they will work alongside them to do the initial triage, understand and respond to common questions, route enquiries to the appropriate team or, in time, enable real-time transactional processing (e.g. buying a train ticket).

As a service provider, if you don’t respond to this challenge, you will be ignored. It takes less than a nanosecond to close an App and go elsewhere, and probably only slightly longer to make the decision to do so, when the experience does not meet expectations. Adding friction to your engagement processes will push customers away, and it is simply not an option to do nothing. If your business fails to respond to the roll-call of providing a seamless digital customer experience, you will get left behind, and possibly quicker than you might think.

So when you’re thinking about how to encourage your customers into your digital embrace, think of Freddie Mercury and remember his primal scream; “I want it all and I want it now!”.

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Ben Park

Principle Value Proposition Lead
Ben has a desire to help organisation deliver exceptional customer facing services, and to use cutting edge technologies and working practices to increase customer value and drive enhanced operational efficiency. Ben is a strong advocate of the use of artificial intelligence, automation and big data related technologies to enable a ‘customer first’ approach to the digital transformation of service provider organisations.

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